In 2010 the Alabama State Board of Education adopted math and English standards that aligned with the Common Core State Standards, a non-partisan effort led by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State Schools Officers. Business, education, and parent groups across the state and across the country have rallied behind the standards in the wake of repeal efforts based on misinformation. The Save Our Standards movement presents the facts and the benefits of the Alabama Standards to ease the fears of parents who have been exposed to the misinformation. This page contains links to documents and websites that support this effort.

2015 Letter of Support from the “Big Four” Metro Chambers in Alabama (PDF) »
2015 Letter of Support from the Tennessee Valley BRAC Committee (PDF) »
2015 Schools Foundation Letter of Support for Alabama College and Career Ready Standards (PDF) »
Alabama GRIT (Graduate Ready. Impact Tomorrow.) Resources »
Homework HelpDesk, a resource to support parent engagement »
2014 Letter of Support from the “Big Four” Metro Chambers in Alabama (PDF) »
2014 Letter of Support from the Tennessee Valley BRAC Committee (PDF) »
2013 Letter of Support from the “Big Four” Metro Chambers in Alabama (PDF) »
2013 Letter of Support from the Tennessee Valley BRAC Committee (PDF) »
Website for Common Core State Standards Initiative: www.corestandards.org »
Alabama Department of Education »
National PTA website including supporting documents related to Common Core »
Huntsville Council of PTAs supports the College and Career Ready Standards »
Madison City School’s video on implementing the College and Career Ready Standards »
Military Child Education Coalition supports the Common Core Standards »
Gen. Collyar Letter to Gov. Bentley (PDF) »
Abandoning 'Common Core' education standards would send wrong message to industry, BRAC (Opinion by retired Lt. Gen. Jim Pillsbury) »
Why Alabama's students need Common Core State Standards (Opinion from Chip Cherry) »

Myths about Common Core

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Common Core is a set of mandatory one-size-fits-all national standards, tests, and curriculum for K-12 that will be controlled from Washington, D.C.

The Common Core State Standards simply provide a baseline of skills that students should have at the end of each grade level. Standards are not curriculum. They are a clear set of shared goals and expectations for what knowledge and skills will help our students succeed. The Common Core State Standards were developed as a bi-partisan effort by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association. These state leaders used educational research and best practices to develop a baseline of grade-appropriate skills that students across the country should have at each grade level.

In Alabama, the State Board of Education adopted the Alabama College and Career Ready Standards in 2010, which are aligned with the Common Core State Standards but include state-specific content. Our Alabama Standards and their implementation are controlled by the State Board, and curriculum is developed to meet the standards.

Local teachers, principals, superintendents and others will decide how the standards are to be met. Teachers will continue to devise lesson plans and tailor instruction to the individual needs of the students in their classrooms. Curriculum decisions still reside with the State Board and the local education authorities.

Common Core collects massive personal, non-academic data on our kids and tracks them.

There is no part of the Alabama Standards that requires or requests data collection from students or parents. The State of Alabama is not required to report any information due to its involvement with the Common Core State Standards. Student data is still protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Common Core will impact private and home schools as well as public schools.

Home schools and private schools are not under any law or regulation or policy that will require them to meet public school education standards.

Education experts assert it will put students two years behind other countries.

It is true that American school children are academically behind some of their foreign peers. This is because American Educational Standards have not kept up, and now, other nations have passed us by inserting more rigor into their standards. The Common Core State Standards have been endorsed by dozens of education associations, business organizations, parent groups and military affi liations. See a growing list of supporters here: www.corestandards.org/resources/statements-of-support.

It moves away from the founding principle that parents, not federal government, should control local education.

Parents remain very engaged in Alabama Public Schools. In fact, the Alabama PTA endorses the Alabama College and Career Ready Standards. And textbook adoption is still a community effort. A committee of parents and educators vet textbooks from a variety of vendors and make recommendations of their preferred textbooks. The local Board of Education then considers the recommendations and either confi rms them or asks that the process begin again.

Common Core will be fully implemented in 2014 unless we stop it now!

The Alabama State Board of Education adopted the current Alabama Standards for K-12 education in 2010. The Alabama Standards are aligned with the Common Core State Standards for math and English. The math standards were introduced during the 2012-2013 school year in Alabama, and English standards will be implemented during the 2013-2014 school year in Alabama. Changing course now will not only be incredibly expensive, it will essentially put learning on hold while new standards are developed and adopted.